Remodeling Your Bathroom? Follow These Steps

If you need to remodel your bathrooms, but the thought overwhelms you, you can start by making a game plan. A little preparation can ensure that your results will match your vision. It can also help accommodate a smoother, swifter remodel.

Remodeling Bathroom Steps

(Pixabay / mattv10)

Here are a few tips to get you started:

Assess your needs

Determine what you need in your bathroom. Start by measuring the dimensions of your current bathroom. Compare this to the plan that you have in mind, then decide which features you can incorporate while staying within the confines of your available space.

Put your vision on paper

Create a folder of your bathroom remodeling ideas. Then, whittle down the options, and make a list of all your bathroom renovation goals. Your budget may not accommodate every improvement, so decide which ones mean the most to you. Be sure to plan for alternate bathroom facilities while yours is under construction.

Establish your budget

Determine the amount of money you are willing to spend for your project, making sure to set aside 20 percent for labor and another 20 percent as a “cushion.” Unexpected expenditures often crop up in the course of a remodel. Assign a projected dollar amount to each improvement.

Hire a contractor

Interview at least three different contractors, and get competing bids. In selecting your contractor, ask friends for references. You can look for contractors online, but make sure to check their reviews. You should also check their construction license and ask for photos of previous projects.

Read the fine print

Review the contract thoroughly before you sign the dotted line. Check the detailed project description, the materials list, the brand names of the products, and the quality of materials to be used. You should also inquire about your contractor’s insurance coverage. Confirm the payment dates and totals.

Your contractor may require a down payment before they start working, but make sure that they do not charge more than a third of the overall cost at the onset.